US Customs And Border Protection Police Officer: Epitome Of Courage And Bravery

 

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U.S.Customs and Border Protection  Police officerus customs

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©Samina Iqbal. 2016

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Trying to understand

My prayer for every Police officer.

“If the divine powers take note of the dutiful in any way,

If there is any justice anywhere,

and a mind recognizing in itself what is right,

May the gods bring you your earned rewards”.

(Virgil, The Aeneid, Book 1, 1.603)

This poem has been written “In memory of fallen officers everywhere”

by: Daniel T. Dunbar

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TRYING TO UNDERSTAND

 “Is daddy coming home soon?” asks a precious little face.

“It’s past when he should be here.

Is he working on a case?”

Your dad’s not coming home son.

He’s working late tonight.

He’s a policeman up in heaven, making sure we’re all alright.

“But mommy, why’d he leave us?

I miss him when he’s gone.”

I know you miss him darling, but now we must be strong.

“Who’s gonna teach me baseball, and help me fly my kite.

And help me with my homework,

and buy me my first bike?”

Your daddy loved you darling, and he didn’t want to leave.

But a bad man took, your daddy, and left us all to grieve.

Be proud of who your dad was,

and how he earned his pay.

Because it’s people like your daddy

that keep us safe each day.

“Mommy, when I get bigger, and if it’s okay with you,

I’m gonna be like daddy, and be a policeman too.”

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© Samina Iqbal. 2016

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Happy Independence Day Everyone.

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We must honor and respect those who protect us

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Lets respect and love those who provide security for us

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We must honor and respect those who fight for our freedom

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©Samina Iqbal. 2016

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Happy Canada Day Everyone. Let the celebration begin.

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RCMP Officer celebrating Canada Day

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©Samina Iqbal. 2016

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My Stats Are Booming. Thanks To Everyone.

 

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BOOM!

“Your blog, Samina’s Forum for police support, appears to be getting more traffic than usual! 33 hourly views – 1 hourly views on average
A spike in your stats”

I got this message from WordPress just now. It makes me very happy. Thank you so much my blogger friends and other friends for such encouragement. Samina

©Samina Iqbal. 2016

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Some of the best people I’ve ever run across in my policing experience: heroin addicts,” Paulson says.

 

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Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson

As a great teacher would talk to the students, our Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson talks to the people of Canada through the media to teach us the most valuable life’s lessons that he has learnt during his policing career. In an interview with the media he told a journalist that when he was in Vancouver, he used to take his children through the Downtown Eastside – to show them what life as an addict was like.

“The people that use drugs are not the people we got to be bothering, right? We’ve got to be sort of helping them. Some of the best people I’ve ever run across in my policing experience: heroin addicts,” Paulson says.

“They’re sick. And you know they do crime, it’s sort of subsidiary, that if they’re doing crime it’s because they need to get heroin. And so they’re doing all sorts of property crime. But when you actually sit down and talk to heroin addicts, they’re really nice people.”

What a valuable life lesson our Teacher Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson teaches us here. We must be kind to people who are already suffering and do not ignore them or look down on them as they could be some of the  best people in our society who have become victims of addiction.

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©Samina Iqbal. 2016

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“Justice”

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Police Officer Protects Baby

 Justice

I closed them gently those eyes of blue
and wept inside, for her years so few.
The call came thru as domestic dispute
the father came thru as one of ill repute
Such a little child , so fair of face
an innocent victim of an unfair fate.

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Police Officer With A child

As her father was cuffed and put away
I grimly drew a line where she lay.
Where were her angels ? Where was the law ?
A life was stolen without just cause.
I questioned my job , my purpose in life, that night I wept over sleeping babies and wife.
And under a sky
as blue as her eyes
I swore to my God to stand by her side.
A Mother was weeping over an angel gone to sleep
While her father walked once more the streets.
I stalked him Like a hunter gone after prey

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RCMP Officer with a Girl

I never forgot him day after day.
A year has gone by and my day has come
To find if my work will be undone.
My heart is lighter as I placed a red rose
I think she’s smiling beside God’s throne.
I’ve said Goodbye , my heart is at rest,
I’ve done my job as I do best.
Goodby little angel ’til next we meet
When God calls us from that final sleep.

(Author Unknown)

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RCMP Officer putting Stetson on a child’s head

© Samina Iqbal. 2016

 

 

 

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Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson’s Quote on higher standard of RCMP officers

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Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson

Ingenuity and wisdom is required in understanding the complexity of Police Work. Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson’s  remarks touch on a number of areas, including harassment within the force.

He says, ” there is an expectation in any police department that officers will be held to a higher standard than the average citizen, and that’s reasonable. But doing that in a rapidly changing society where notions of fairness and justice have to be respected can be a challenge”.

The commissioner also says, “the stress, hours and collegiality in law enforcement, as well as the nature of the work, can leave it a ripe area for behaviours that are less than professional. Nonetheless,  the force is making progress when it comes to harassment, including enhancement of its harassment-management policy”.

© Samina Iqbal. 2016

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Address Of Canine Commandant Gary. D. K. Holly about the global effort in using ancient techniques in catching Modern Criminals

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Commandant Gary. D. K. Holly, canine school of advanced psychiatry and transcendental meditation, est 1893

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Chief Instructor Oscar P. Dicken Doo, born during cold December, on the Northern slope of Mount Kilimanjaro and raised on the footpath of Mombassa.

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Senior Instructor Jhonny. D. Simm, Simm, born during summer months on the Southern foothills of Himalayas and raised on the sunny beaches of Lake Key Key Yo Yo.

“We want our canines to chase criminals with a positive attitude  not with anger, but with patience. For this purpose two canine yogi’s, Oscar. P. Dicken Doo, and Jhonny. D. Simm. Simm, have arrived to our academy to give out a workshop. Briefly this approach requires the release of negative energy before the chase of the criminal is pursued. The Proven method is to lower the left ear and raise the right leg for 30 seconds, then lower the right ear and raise the left leg for 45 seconds. This is followed by rotating the tail like a pendulum, once clockwise and twice anti-clockwise then holding the tail at nine o’ clock position. Take a deep breath followed by a long, loud bark and you’re ready to go. Anywhere this method has been applied arrests of the criminals have been 100% and public relations is at the optimum. When asked under oath, even the seasoned criminals confessed, being arrested by this procedure was a positive and a pleasant experience.”

Participants of the workshop came from all Continents of the World.

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© Samina Iqbal. 2016

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Our Leaders, Our Protectors, Our Saviors-Police Officers.

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Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson

“I have seen the king with a face of glory,

He who is the eye and the sun of heaven,

He who is the companion and healer of all beings,

He who is the soul and the universe that births souls”.

(Rumi)

Leaders are born with a charisma that can be perfected through instruction, coaching, diligent hard work and perseverance. Leaders stand out because of their own exclusive élan making worthy use of their talents, and evolving as adept emissaries of any establishment.

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Only a handful among us can be leaders. Most exist in the business world, military services and law enforcement. Leaders prove their distinction in the real world of success and failure–life and death. Leadership is a special quality that is not hereditary nor something you can acquire by virtue of promotion or designation.

A leader is much more than only just somebody with power. Wide-ranging qualities come to light and refer to a leader being something of a nonconformist, someone who takes bold risks, an innovative person. He is not fearful to embark into a novel arena. Such a leader is audacious and a visionary who strikes an exceptional timbre within his supporters.

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Great leaders in law enforcement care for their workforce. Police officers view those leaders as their true leaders who are selfless and caring. They look towards and turn towards those leaders who really care about them. Law enforcement leadership does not obey a rigid description.

Leadership in law enforcement is survived by those who feel the Calling. Not every leader feels the calling and not everyone answers, in reality very few rise to the challenge.

In today’s world of myths, thrill and symbolism, influenced by the mass media, political figures and mass marketing, true leaders face enormous challenges.

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The essence of a leader is shaped both by physical and mental personae, astuteness, ability and disposition.

“A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.”

(Douglas Mac Arthur.)

Leaders possess a candid magnanimity for the people they lead. A sense of resoluteness encompasses their thinking, empowering them to get things done. Despite impediments, leaders mostly triumph against the odds.

Leaders are gifted with wisdom and sharp sense of perception to endure what comes with pride and humbleness.

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They intuitively discern when to wage war and when to reconcile. They know that ethical and honorable procedures are the essence of headship. Hence their sense of duty makes them prefer excellence over mundane and substance over symbolism.

Leaders prefer to stand alone when others take off for their protection, and they stay put when the going gets tough, since they know that this is their test of competence and reliability.

Great leaders have dynamic disposition, a hue of magnetism that makes them unique. They can be spotted in a room full of people solely by their presence, something about them stands out. The innermost forte of their leadership flair arises from their persona. A leader is on a mission, and we can see it.

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Leadership is the pinnacle of societal association, and leaders instinctively are aware of this fact. Although these majestic elevations frighten some, leaders do not mind the high altitude of social intricacy. They stand tall amidst the glories of their successes and look upwards where sky is no limit for them, working and producing at various levels. As time goes by the great leader comprehends the significance of individuals over procedures.

There comes a phase in the life of the leader when he/she becomes less uneasy with position, honor or drive. Deep concern for others and the Inner Calling takes precedent over egoistic instincts.

“ Be like the sun for grace and mercy. Be like the night to cover others’ faults. Be like running water for generosity. Be like death for rage and anger. Be like the earth for modesty. Appear as you are. Be as you appear.” (Rumi)

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U.S.A Leadership Ranks

© Samina Iqbal. 2016

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“Beyond What You See”

Those who serve and Protect us day and night,  also need our appreciation and prayers. We take this great service by our protectors for granted and sometimes forget the fact that they need our support and love and care as much as any other human being. This wonderful poem reminds us how thankful we must feel for all the great services by our great Police Officers. They make our world not only safe and secure for us but also make our lives easier to live as they play a major role in making this world a better place for us all to live and enjoy. A gesture of recognition, a nod of appreciation now and then will only make us feel better. Lets show them that we care and respect them and are thankful from the bottom of our hearts for their selfless service and care for us. May God bless and protect  our  Protectors. Amin.c4401072c42b82c24793b5b49bb26f35

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RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) Officers

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“Beyond What You See”

Police Officers

American Police Officers

© Samina Iqbal. 2016.

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Happy New Year 2016

All the good wishes and prayers for the safety and security of our most unsafe saviors-our protectors, our police officers.

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My blogger friends here is a  heart warming story of recovery of a Police Officer released from hospital on the eve of New Year 2016, after being a victim of shooting at a regular traffic stop. Lets appreciate the role our saviors play to protect us while putting their lives on line for us. May God protect them and keep them safe for us. Amen. Samina

Officer Lopez: ‘Grateful, Honored’ To Be Alive After Shooting
December 31, 2015 3:49 PM
DENVER (CBS4)– Denver Police Officer Tony Lopez Jr. got to go home on New Year’s Eve after he barely survived a shooting earlier this month.

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“I’m in a lot of pain but also I have a lot of support and love especially from my fellow coppers,” said Lopez.

Lopez appeared in a wheelchair with his wife and surgeon by his side. He and his wife are expecting their first child next year.
“My wife’s pregnant and that’s all I could think about, making sure I stayed awake so I can meet my baby,” said Lopez.

The officer left Denver Health Medical Center on Thursday afternoon where he has been recovering since Dec. 8 when a suspect shot him multiple times.

Lopez was shot during a traffic stop near Federal Boulevard and Clyde Place when the suspect carjacked a vehicle in an attempt to get away. Jason Wood, was arrested after a short chase following the shooting and another person of interest, Melinda Espinoza, turned herself into police. Wood has been charged with attempted first-degree murder.
“I’m very grateful and I’m very honored,” said Lopez of his recovery.

Doctors have said Lopez was as close to death as you can get after he was shot several times in the legs, arm and bulletproof vest. Doctors said he lost nearly all his blood and credit paramedics on scene with saving his life.

“I just wanted to say I’m grateful for everybody and every person who got me here and all the other officers who responded to the scene and paramedics,” said Lopez.

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Lopez talked about the paramedics first on scene, Courtney Strong and Dustin Morgan. They were honored on Wednesday by Denver Chief of Police Robert White.

“Especially Courtney, I remember her talking to me in the back of the ambulance and my partner talking to me in the back of the ambulance, telling me to hang on,” said Lopez.

Denver Police Chief Robert White honored paramedics Courtney Strong and Dustin Morgan for saving the life of Officer Tony Lopez Jr. (credit: CBS)

Lopez said he’s looking forward to ringing in 2016 with his wife at home.

You take a lot of things for granted,” said Lopez. “I’m excited to be home and spend it with my wife and family.”

Although grateful, Lopez has a lot of work to do before his first born arrives.
“Right now my left foot doesn’t really work, I’m waiting for the nerves to come back and once that happens I’ll be able to start walking and get closer to putting my uniform on,” said Lopez.

“I need this to come on quick because I want to walk my baby out of the hospital.”

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©Samina Iqbal. 2015

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“Four people were in the car and only one survived,” Cst. Donnie Robertson – New Brunswick

Impaired driving is the number one criminal cause of death in Canada. RCMP officers are often the first on the scene at motor vehicle crashes and see how tragic the decision to drink and driving really is. They also see the hurt families experience when they’ve learned that a loved one has died.

RCMP officers from Atlantic Canada recall the crashes that have had an impact on them and also on the people and communities involved. These stories are personal accounts of what happened. The memories of these fatal crashes stay with the police officers, it’s the reality of what happens when a person drinks and drives.

Driving drunk is a choice. These officers hope that by sharing their stories a life or lives can be saved.

Cst. Donnie Robertson – New Brunswick

“In policing we are trained to expect the unexpected, to always be alert and to always be aware of our surroundings. The importance of this training hit home in an unexpected way in the early years of my first RCMP posting.

It was a November night and considering the time of year it was a nice evening. No snow had fallen yet and I was dispatched to a single vehicle crash. When I arrived, I found a smashed up car on its wheels. Hanging out the rear passenger window was a young man. He was alive when first responders arrived but unfortunately they were unable to save him.
As a police officer, it was my role to investigate the cause of the crash. While assessing the situation with another officer, we heard a long drawn out moan. It sounded like it was coming from the woods next to the road. We all pointed our flashlights towards the trees.

As I walked a few feet into the woods, I saw a young man on his hands and knees who was obviously seriously injured. I called out for help saying I found someone and as I said that, I stumbled, much to my surprise, over another body on the ground. It was another young man but he didn’t move. He was not breathing; he had already passed away. As I got up, the beam of my flashlight shines on another person, just a few feet away from me. This young man had also died as the result of his injuries. The reality of this crash immediately sinks in; four people were in the car but only one survived. The survivor remained in a coma for several days, but had no memory of the crash.

The collision reconstructionist determined that the car missed a turn, went off the road and struck a culvert. The vehicle flew about 200 feet (60 metres) through the air. None of the four occupants wore seatbelts and three of them were thrown about 100 feet (30 metres) from the vehicle into the nearby woods where only one survived. The investigation later determined that all four men had blood alcohol content levels above the legal limit.

This crash caused great heartache to the small rural communities where these men, all in their 20s, lived and further caused the friends and families of the victims to ask many questions about how something like this could happen.

In my 15 years as an RCMP officer I have responded to many impaired driving incidents. Each one is terrible in its own way but what each one has in common is that none of them had to happen. It all comes down to choices and choosing not to drink and drive.”

(the reproduction is a copy of an official work that is published by the Government of Canada and that the reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada.)

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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Montgomery County Officer Praised for Saving Baby’s Life

A Montgomery County officer performed CPR on a 9-month-old baby girl on the side of Interstate 270 Sunday afternoon, ultimately saving her life.

Source: Montgomery County Officer Praised for Saving Baby’s Life

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“As a mom, she knew something was wrong,” Sgt. André Pepin – New Brunswick

Impaired driving is the number one criminal cause of death in Canada. RCMP officers are often the first on the scene at motor vehicle crashes and see how tragic the decision to drink and driving really is. They also see the hurt families experience when they’ve learned that a loved one has died.

RCMP officers from Atlantic Canada recall the crashes that have had an impact on them and also on the people and communities involved. These stories are personal accounts of what happened. The memories of these fatal crashes stay with the police officers, it’s the reality of what happens when a person drinks and drives.

Driving drunk is a choice. These officers hope that by sharing their stories a life or lives can be saved.

Sgt. André Pepin – New Brunswick
Sgt. André Pepin holding a whiteboard: “As a mom, she knew something was wrong.”
“As a mom, she knew something was wrong”

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Sgt. André Pepin – New Brunswick

As a qualified breathalyzer technician for 23 years, I have had many encounters with individuals who were impaired. It’s common to hear them tell me, “I’ve only had a couple of drinks officer,” as I prepare to take a breath sample in order to determine their level of impairment. The breath test often indicated they should not have been driving; that they should have made a better choice or someone they knew didn’t stop them from getting behind the wheel.

I’ll never forget the night that I wished I had heard those words from one young man. It would have meant I stopped him from driving and that he was no longer behind the wheel of his car. Why? Because I ended up meeting him by way of a 9-1-1 call. I was dispatched to a single vehicle crash on a rural two lane secondary road. It was a warm summer’s night and the road conditions were dry. The call came in the middle of the night; he was probably the only car on the road. This man, in his 20s, was driving home from his birthday party. He lost control of his car, it went off the road and it crashed into a culvert and died.

I wish I knew what he was thinking and why he wanted to drive. I hope he wasn’t thinking “I’ve only had a couple of drinks.” This individual lived at home with his parents; it was my job to give them the bad news. I’ll never forget the look on the mother’s face or when she asked “What happened?” as we stood at the front door of their home. As a mom, she knew something was wrong. She knew he was out celebrating his birthday and when she woke up that morning he wasn’t home. Instead, I arrived at the door.

(the reproduction is a copy of an official work that is published by the Government of Canada and that the reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada.)

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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“One lived and one did not” Cpl. Janet Leblanc – Nova Scotia

Impaired driving is the number one criminal cause of death in Canada. RCMP officers are often the first on the scene at motor vehicle crashes and see how tragic the decision to drink and driving really is. They also see the hurt families experience when they’ve learned that a loved one has died.

RCMP officers from Atlantic Canada recall the crashes that have had an impact on them and also on the people and communities involved. These stories are personal accounts of what happened. The memories of these fatal crashes stay with the police officers, it’s the reality of what happens when a person drinks and drives.

Driving drunk is a choice. These officers hope that by sharing their stories a life or lives can be saved.

Cpl. Janet Leblanc – Nova Scotia
Cpl. Janet Leblanc sitting in RCMP cruiser, holding whiteboard: “One lived and one did not”
“One lived and one did not”

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I was working in Lunenburg County when the RCMP received a call that a parked ambulance had been struck by a vehicle. While EHS staff tended to a patient inside a local residence, a neighbour of the patient ended up driving into the ambulance.

While the scenario with the ambulance was unfolding, the RCMP were also called to a single-vehicle motor vehicle crash involving a lone male driver. Unfortunately, the occupant of the vehicle did not survive and he was pronounced deceased at the scene.

While it is not unusual for the RCMP to receive multiple calls at the same time, I will never forget the unfortunate and sad interconnectedness of these two cases.

Through the course of our investigation regarding the driver who struck the parked ambulance, it was discovered that he was impaired at the time of the collision. This man also stated that he had been drinking all evening with a friend at a local establishment.

In a sad twist of fate, our investigation revealed that the man who died in the crash was actually the friend and drinking partner of the man who struck the parked ambulance. When I had to tell the man that his friend had died, he almost fell to the floor in grief.

At the end of the day, two friends went drinking at a bar and then decided to drive while impaired. Both males drove off separately, and both were in collisions within minutes of each other. One lived and one did not.

I will always remember the pain on this man’s face when I had to tell him about his friend, and I would love to know if this tragic event has prevented him from drinking and driving again. Because if this sad event couldn’t stop someone from drinking and driving, what could?

Cpl. Janet LeBlanc has been a member of the RCMP for 18 years, and has carried out police work in three different Nova Scotia districts since 1997.

(the reproduction is a copy of an official work that is published by the Government of Canada and that the reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada.)

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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“What will stay with me…..is the scream,” Cst. Vanessa DeMerchant – New Brunswick

Impaired driving is the number one criminal cause of death in Canada. RCMP officers are often the first on the scene at motor vehicle crashes and see how tragic the decision to drink and driving really is. They also see the hurt families experience when they’ve learned that a loved one has died.

RCMP officers from Atlantic Canada recall the crashes that have had an impact on them and also on the people and communities involved. These stories are personal accounts of what happened. The memories of these fatal crashes stay with the police officers, it’s the reality of what happens when a person drinks and drives.

Driving drunk is a choice. These officers hope that by sharing their stories a life or lives can be saved.

Cst. Vanessa DeMerchant – New Brunswick
Cst. DeMerchant standing outside a police vehicle on side of highway, holding whiteboard: “What will stay with me…..is the scream”
“What will stay with me…..is the scream”

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I was just weeks away from marking my fourth anniversary as a member of the RCMP. I’d already gained experience in many areas but little did I know what I would experience one late October night. I was posted in a remote area where the communities are close knit because they are far apart. It was near one of these communities where I would get dispatched to my first impaired driving crash; a crash where someone would lose their life.

It was 1 a.m. and I was told by our dispatch that a single vehicle had struck a rock face along the edge of the highway and there was one person trapped in the vehicle. What I saw when I arrived at the scene was much different. The car was on fire and it looked like someone was still in the back of the vehicle. Unfortunately, there was nothing I could do. The fire was hot and the car was fully engulfed in flames. I quickly searched around but could not find the driver or anyone else who may have been in the vehicle.
A crowd started to gather as people from the nearby community, where the young victim lived, started arriving at the crash scene to see what happened. After the crowd had left, a man arrived at the scene and he was totally distraught. There are things I will never forget from that night; it seems as if all of my senses had been affected. I can still feel the heat from the fire, the smell as everything was burning, but what will stay with me for the rest of my life is the scream the man let out when he got to the crash. This father had just lost his daughter.

The investigation was taken over by an RCMP collision reconstructionist as they are involved in looking into collisions resulting in serious injury or death. I would later learn that alcohol was a contributing factor to this fatal crash and that two other people were in the vehicle but survived.

The motor vehicle fatality statistics increased that day with another person losing their life as the result of impaired driving. What the statistics don’t reveal is how families, communities and first responders are affected. The statistics didn’t reflect the heartache and anguish shared by the families and communities connected to this crash. This one I will carry for the rest of my life because I knew the young woman who died that night. Our paths had crossed many times at community events where she was helping her community by giving back. I saw she had a bright future; a future that her community will never be able to see or experience.

(the reproduction is a copy of an official work that is published by the Government of Canada and that the reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada.)

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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“Her first words… ‘There’s a dead body,” Cst. Douglas Baker – Prince Edward Island

There are many reasons not to drink and drive. Impaired driving is the number one criminal cause of death in Canada. RCMP officers are often the first on the scene at motor vehicle crashes and see how tragic the decision to drink and driving really is. They also see the hurt families experience when they’ve learned that a loved one has died.

 RCMP officers from Atlantic Canada recall the crashes that have had an impact on them and also on the people and communities involved. These stories are personal accounts of what happened. The memories of these fatal crashes stay with the police officers, it’s the reality of what happens when a person drinks and drives.

Driving drunk is a choice. RCMP officers hope that by sharing their stories a life or lives can be saved.

Cst. Douglas Baker – Prince Edward Island
Cst. Douglas Baker holding a whiteboard: “Her first words… ‘There’s a dead body’,”
“Her first words… ‘There’s a dead body”

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Cst. Douglas Baker – Prince Edward Island

It was a regular start to a weekend summer shift, no different than any other. Performing traffic stops in the early evening hours and enjoying the sunshine, not knowing the horrific ending the shift would have.

I performed a traffic stop on a vehicle with a male driver, female passenger and another young male in the back seat. After checking all of the vehicle papers, ensuring no one was drinking and all were buckled up, I was happy to send them on their way as they told me they were headed to a party.

As I sat in my car waiting for them to depart, the young female passenger got out of the car and cheerfully skipped back to my vehicle and, through my passenger window said, “Could you give us a boost, the car is dead?” Without hesitation I pulled around, boosted their car and sent them on their way.

At about 2:30 a.m., I was on my way to drop off an auxiliary member who had joined me for the shift. We laughed and joked as we drove along, as we usually did. Little did we know the night was about to get gruesome.

As we made our way down the unlit rural road, I observed a car sitting at an intersection about to merge onto the road. As we approached, the car didn’t move so I became suspicious and slowed down. As I got closer, I could see a lone female standing on the road. She looked in shock. Her first words… “There’s a dead body.”

I got out of my vehicle to see a mangled wreck of a car down in a deep ditch. There was a body of a young girl lying on an embankment….obviously dead. The driver of the vehicle had made it out of the wreck and went to the only nearby house, that of the witness I had met on the road.

It was the same vehicle I had pulled over earlier.

The driver of the vehicle swore it was only him and his girlfriend in the vehicle…over and over…despite my knowing another male was with them earlier. A search of the immediate area turned up nothing.

Not until daybreak did we find the body of the other male, some 100 yards from the scene. He had been catapulted from the wreck like a marble in a slingshot.

Two young adults were dead. As it turns out, the driver was later found to be intoxicated and high and had passed out behind the wheel. The one good decision he made was to put on his seatbelt which saved his life.

In the morning we went to deliver the terrible news to the families. I spoke with the brother of the deceased female and the mother of the deceased male; they all lived in the same house. They had traveled to the province to work for the summer before returning home. They were completely devastated. It was an unimaginable image.

Two lives were lost that night, many changed forever, mine included. The images of that innocent 20 year-old woman skipping back to my car and wondering what had happened in between – and if there was anything different I could have done haunt me to this very day.

(the reproduction is a copy of an official work that is published by the Government of Canada and that the reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada.)

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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Police Efforts To Protect And Guide Our Youngsters, Where All Else Fails

Police Officers always try to do maximum to ensure that the criminal elements remain away from us as we go about our lives. They believe more in reform rather than punishment. Apart from their daily routine jobs they keep uplifting their efforts to educate and inform the most vulnerable segment of our society that is the young children of impressionable ages. One such example is the Camp Cadet organized and arranged by multiple Police agencies. It is a commendable effort on part of our protectors to educate and guide our young children towards a better future. Let’s thank them heartily and honor their efforts towards a better society. 

(This news item is taken from CBS Pittsburgh. I am sure my blogger friends will like reading it). Samina.

Police Hoping To Keep Kids On Positive Track With Camp Cadet
image PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — It’s not often that you see a motorcycle escort for a bunch of kids on bicycles. But these aren’t just any kids. A select group of 64 youngsters arrives on the North Shore as part of the 11th annual Camp Cadet.
It’s the Allegheny County version of week-long camps sponsored by the Pennsylvania State Police.
Trooper Robin Mungo says it’s one of 27 Camp Cadets across the state. She says it’s a community effort.
“It’s a great collaborative of multiple police agencies, and it’s about reaching out to the community, young people, ages 12 to 14,” said Trooper Mungo. “This is the age where they’re most impressionable, so we want to make a good impression. We want them to know that we’re people of the community.”
They concluded the 12-mile trek from Camp Guyasuta at the Law Enforcement Memorial on the North Shore. Among the activities, they will witness Pittsburgh’s River Rescue team in action.
“We have a lot of fun activities for them,” Trooper Mungo adds. “But they understand there’s a mission. We stay on task, and the mission will be accomplished when they graduate on Saturday.”
She says these kids are at an age where they can go one way – or the other.
“We want them to stay on a positive track. We want other kids to see that they are positive,” said Trooper Mungo. “They are the leaders. And that’s what we’re hoping to pull out of them. We all have it in us. It’s how we pull it out, and use that.”
A total of 600 boys and girls in Allegheny County have graduated from camps like this over the past 10 years.

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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I’m Just Like You

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Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson

Honorable RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson talks about the role of women in the Police force and says:

“We need to increase women coming into the force, we need to increase women in the senior executive ranks,” Commissioner Paulson said, explaining his goal is to have “more women in our decision-making process”. He further emphasized, “The value of having women in a Police Role is that you take the interaction with a citizen away from the Force Dynamic, and you put it in the behavior, Thoughtful Dynamic. It is quite a Powerful Force to be reckoned with. We have this sort of traditional notion that we are wrestling people, jumping on people, putting handcuffs on people. The woman’s view of the world is a much more Powerful, Persuasive Force than just an arm around the neck.”

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A Police Officer

“I’m Just Like You”

I have been where you fear to be;
I have seen what you fear to see;
I have done what you fear to do;
All these things I have done for you.

I am the one you lean upon,
The one you cast your scorn upon,
The one you bring your troubles to,
All these things I have been for you.

The one you ask to stand apart,
The one you feel should have no heart,
The one you call the “man in blue”;
But I am a person, just like you.

And through the years,
I have come to see
That I am not what you ask of me.
So take this badge, take this gun;
Will you take it? – Will anyone?

And when you watch a person die
And hear a battered baby cry,
Then do you think that you can be
All these things you ask of me?

 (Author unknown)

image

RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) Officer

© Samina Iqbal. 2015

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